Favorite books in five words

ww2020

This is a tag that has been making rounds last year (and we never picked it up, slightly overwhelmed by the task) – thankfully, it has also been suggested for this year’s Wyrd and Wonder. After some deliberations, and temptations from every side (yes, we’re looking particularly at you, Bookforager and Maddalena! :D) we decided to make our own rendition of the tag. Here it is!

Ola:

Brent Weeks, The Black Prism (2010)

The Black Prism

“Rainbows everywhere! And female afflictions.”

Brian McClellan, The Powder Mage trilogy (2013 – 2015)

“Can You Shoot a God?”

Michail Bulhakov, The Master and Margarita (1967)

The Master and Margarita

“Magic and mayhem in Moscow”, or “Dancing with Devils. Dangerous Delights!”

Joe Abercrombie, The First Law trilogy (2007 – 2009)

The_First_Law

“Beware the Bad Bald Guy”

R.J. Barker, The Bone Ships (2019)

The Bone Ships

“Bones Float. Creepy but True”

Adrian Czajkowski, Shadows of the Apt (2008 – 2014)

Czajkowski_Shadows of the Apt

“Invertebrate at WWII”

Piotrek:

Adrian Czajkowski, Guns of the Dawn (2015)

Guns-of-the-Dawn

“Jane Austen Enlisted in Vietnam”

Tim Powers, The Drawing of the Dark (1979)

the-drawing-of-the-dark

“Will Beer Save the West?”

Jean van Hamme, Grzegorz Rosinski, Thorgal (1977 – 2006)

Thorgal

“Sensitive Viking from Outer Space”

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods (1992)

Small Gods

“Divine Tortoise’s Journey of Enlightment”

David Weber, Honorverse (1992 – 2018)

HonorverseCompanion_FINAL_Sm

“Horatio Hornblower in Straw-Space”

We really enjoyed it – hope you did too! πŸ˜€

43 thoughts on “Favorite books in five words

  1. Beware the Bald Guy is only 4 words.
    And for female afflictions, you just wait if you thought it was bad in that book 😦

    Isn’t a “sensitive viking” an oxymoron? πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

    1. And as for Weeks, I’m not really bothered by his fixation on female physiology, though I cannot help but notice he has one! πŸ˜‚ I enjoyed The Black Prism a lot, and intend to write a post on it one of these days. I’ll definitely continue with the series, but I admit reading Black Prism had been quite exhausting – I felt I needed a break πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The Powder Mage trilogy was brilliant. Seeing those covers brings back fond reading memories. Have you read the Gods of Blood and Powder trilogy too? I haven’t read the final book yet but so far it’s been really good.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Yes, I have read the first two books in the new trilogy – I’m still waiting for my copy of the final installment, and should get it fairly soon (depending on the timeline for opening the libraries! πŸ˜‰)

      Liked by 1 person

    1. No worries, Dave! We intentionally chose many less popular books to spread the love, so you can look at it as not being behind but having a lot to enjoy ahead! πŸ˜„

      Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s the idea! And the spirit, Lashaan! Read it, read it, read it! (I’m chanting under my breath :P)
      Thorgal is pretty cool and immensely readable, and beautifully drawn, IMO, and when you remember there was a time personages such as Erich von Daniken and their cranky ideas ruled the social imagination… everything was possible then! Just check Marvel Eternals – compared to them, Thorgal is the epitome of intellectual subtlety πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Six memorable stories: in five words? | Cath Humphris

    1. Well, look at the bright side – so much reading ahead! πŸ˜„ I think you’d enjoy the Lightbringer series, it’s a very good epic fantasy, well written, though not without its quirks. Worth trying!

      Liked by 1 person

          1. It may be a good solution to certain reading problems… It’s just that I usually listen to books in the car, and that needs to take into account the reading interests of others πŸ˜‰

            Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks! That was the idea and I’m happy we delivered! πŸ˜€
      Would you like to try this tag? It’s plenty of fun, though it looks quite daunting at first πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s a very universal one, I could use it to describe almost all Abercrombie’s books set in this universe 🀣🀣🀣

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s